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Live Healthy Miami Gardens

Live Healthy Miami Gardens

About Live Healthy Miami Gardens

Live Healthy Miami Gardens (LHMG) aims to foster and maintain a community culture of health and well-being for all residents of the city through access, information, activities and services. LHMG works to develop and implement community-level strategies to address 5 focus areas: Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs (ATOD); Healthy Eating and Improved Nutrition; Mental Health; Physical Activity; and Primary Health Care.

UHP has worked closely with the LHMG Physical Activity Health Impact Team to lead in the identification of policy, systems, and built and social environmental changes that can help increase physical activity and improve the health of Miami Gardens residents.

Live Healthy Miami Gardens is an initiative aimed at making this vibrant neighborhood a healthier place to live. The initiative, which launched in 2014, focuses on bringing the community together, following a strategic plan of action, increasing coordination, and making change that improves the health of Miami Gardens residents. The City of Miami Gardens is the primary coordinator of the project. Health Foundation of South Florida, a nonprofit grantmaking organization, is providing the project up to $3.75 million in support over the first six years of the initiative. For more information on Live Healthy Miami Gardens, visit: http://livehealthymiamigardens.com/.

About the Funder

The mission of Health Foundation of South Florida is to invest in and be a catalyst for collaborations, policy and systems change that improves the health of South Florida communities, with a focus on vulnerable, low to moderate income populations. Established in 1993, the nonprofit foundation has awarded over $125 million to nonprofits providing programs and services in Broward, Miami-Dade and Monroe Counties.For more information, visit hfsf.org and follow @HealthSFL.

Community Liaisons

UHP has led community liaison (CL) programs in communities throughout South Florida, and in the Live Healthy Miami Gardens project 3 CLs have been obtained through a leadership stipend that are residents of Miami Gardens that will act as bike/walk community coordinators. The residents will help advance the work and sustain the Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program over the long term. The community coordinators will be trained and work side-by-side with the UHP team in the implementation of the SRTS strategies.

Meet our Community Liaisons! (Please stay tuned for updates)

Meet Michelle Booth!

Michelle Booth joined UHP as the Bike/Walk Community Liaison in October of 2019. She is currently working on her master’s degree in School Counseling at St Thomas University. Michelle has an undergraduate degree in Criminal Justice with Homeland Security. Michelle was born and raised in the city of Carol City located in Miami Gardens. She hopes to maximize collaboration among all local families and schools to improve the quality of life of the families in the area. Prior to joining UHP, Michelle has worked at an Elementary School and Middle school in the hopes to bring a change with her outgoing spirit and her love for the community and the kids. She is passionate in helping and empowering the community through advocacy and developing strategies that improve health and social outcomes.

Meet Ebony Harris!

Ebony Harris has spent her adult life nurturing children through self-created programs which emphasize educational growth, daily living skills, and positive self affirmations. As a City of Miami Gardens resident, her main objective as a Community Liaison is to continue to advocate for safe and conducive environments for Miami-Dade County students.

Safe Routes to School

Safe Routes to School (SRTS) is a development plan in partnership with Live Healthy Miami Gardens. SRTS provides support to key schools in Miami Gardens: Hibiscus Elementary, Rainbow Park Elementary, Carol City Middle, and North County K-8) to address the 5Es: Engineering, Encouragement, Enforcement, Education, and Evaluation. The plan was finalized, and in this phase of the project, multiple outcomes would be to work with schools and partners on the implementation of the strategies in the plan. The idea would be to implement a range of strategies within multiple categories of the 5Es for at least 3 of the schools that participated in the development of the plan. For example, within the evaluation category, an outcome would be conduct walking audits to determine exist conditions and student/parent experiences. The information collected would be incorporated into the implementation of strategies presented in the other 5E categories with one of the highlights being a tactical urbanism project where we install wayfinding, sidewalk decals, and/or other elements to start to create a safer environment for students.

The implementation of SRTS strategies would generate outcomes that create safer and healthier opportunities for families. The focus would be to implement a range of strategies within the 6Es (saferoutespartnership.org/blog/6-es-safe-routes-school-embracing-equity) at 3 MG schools. Achieving these outcomes would including working with each school to determine the combination of strategies, hiring residents to assist and build sustainability, coordinating the implementation, and building the capacity of individuals at the school to continue this work. We have also included the implementation of one encouragement strategy that will make changes to the built environment through signage, markings, and sidewalk decals.

UHP has led community liaison (CL) programs in communities throughout South Florida, and in this project we will obtain 3 CLs through a leadership stipend that are residents of Miami Gardens that will act as bike/walk community coordinators. The residents will help advance the work and sustain the SRTS program over the long term. The community coordinators will be trained and work side-by-side with the UHP team in the implementation of the SRTS strategies.

Creating a Wayfinding Plan

The goal of the project would be to create an active transportation wayfinding plan that builds off the existing signage throughout the City and creates a more explicit connection to community assets, such as parks, health centers, healthy restaurants, healthy stores, and schools. Wayfinding is a component of the Live Healthy Miami Gardens Community Action Plan and aligns with sub-strategies in the mental health, physical activity, nutrition, and primary care focus areas. The plan would lay out the most important destinations to provide information on active transportation options for residents. An extensive network of parks, walking paths, bike lanes, trails, and bus and trolley service already canvas the City, this action plan would improve those connections and could be installed through existing City of Miami Gardens funding or other grant opportunities.

One of the essential components of providing wayfinding throughout a City is to provide information to residents and visitors so that they can orient themselves and navigate from place to place. The focus of this plan is to improve physical activity by providing information to the community about opportunities to walk, bicycle and ride transit to specific community assets in the City of Miami Gardens. The plan would highlight destinations to parks, health centers, and schools, but also will look at areas that the community could access for their daily needs such as commercial districts, healthy restaurants, healthy stores, and other points of interest. This plan is aimed at building off the signage that exists throughout the City of Miami Gardens near parks and at trolley stops.

PSE Changes

Physical Activity Strategies for Bicycle and Pedestrian Improvements

Use this reiterative step-by-step process to leverage community resources and address barriers in achieving the set goal. Utilize ideas from the mobility meeting on Tuesday, June 13, 2017 generated around policy, system, and environmental changes that would increase physical activity (PA) of Miami Gardens residents through bicycle and pedestrian improvements.

Step 1: Set Goal: Create a safe environment that promotes walking and bicycling and increases Miami Gardens residents’ incidental physical activity levels.

Step 2: Gather Knowledge: Gather information from quantitative or qualitative data that provides insight to the community’s status on addressing the goal. Examples include reviewing inventory of existing plans and reports, local statistics,  SWOT analysis, community input, etc.

Step 3: Assess Social Networks and Context: Assess the network of existing organized and unorganized groups that impact or support the community. Additionally, assess the cultural and historical context and social tendencies that could influence achieving the goal.

Step 4: Identify Motivator: Identify what motivates the community to engage in the current behaviors that influence the set goal. Answer the question why the community chooses to behave the way they do. One or more motivators should be chosen per intercept.

Step 5: Identify Intercept: Identify in layman terms promising change tools (intercepts) that would effectively address each motivator. Answer the question what needs to happen to motivate change in the community’s behavior. Each intercept will lead to a proposed change.

Step 6: Propose and Implement Change: Propose policy, system, and/or environmental (PSE) changes that implement the identified intercept through an evidence-based practice. Each proposed change should be written as a SMART objective. More than one change per intercept is encouraged. Identify achievable time bound milestones or action items, responsible parties, and expendable resources prior to implementation. Implement change.

Step 7: Monitor Change: Conduct a process evaluation during the implementation of a PSE change to document progress or identify modifications that need to be made to achieve the set goal.

Step 8: Reassess Goal: Evaluate whether each PSE impacted the set goal. If there is full success in meeting the set goal then the cycle is complete; a failure or partial success will add to the knowledge base and the cycle should be repeated.

Master Mobility Plan

The first phase of the Master Mobility plan was to create a list of pedestrian and bicycle projects that would increase active transportation options throughout the City. The process produced a list of prioritized mobility projects and static mapping for the City to implement.

Another of the outcomes of the previous project was the development of a SRTS plan for key schools in MG that would support a range of strategies that address the 5Es: Engineering, Encouragement, Enforcement, Education, and Evaluation. The plan was finalized, and in this phase of the project, multiple outcomes would be to work with schools and partners on the implementation of the strategies in the plan. The idea would be to implement a range of strategies within multiple categories of the 5Es for at least 3 of the schools that participated in the development of the plan. For example, within the evaluation category, an outcome would be conduct walking audits to determine exist conditions and student/parent experiences. The information collected would be incorporated into the implementation of strategies presented in the other 5E categories with one of the highlights being a tactical urbanism project where we install wayfinding, sidewalk decals, and/or other elements to start to create a safer environment for students.

Upcoming Events

Please stay tuned for upcoming events

Past Events

Hibiscus Elementary Walk to School

Rainbow Park Walk to School

Carol City Middle Bike to School

Resources

Live Healthy Miami Gardens

https://livehealthymiamigardens.com


Safe Routes to School Partnerships

https://saferoutespartnership.org


iWalk Safe

http://iwalksafe.org/


iBike Safe

http://ibikesafe.org/


Smart Growth America: National Complete Streets Coalition

https://smartgrowthamerica.org/program/national-complete-streets-coalition/

Program Contact
To partner with Live Healthy Miami Gardens or for more information about the initiative, please contact:

Laurie Fucini-Joy: laurie@urbanhp.org